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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
most of the rest of the world in reading, math and science. also new insight on how men and women's brains are different. and macy's is taken to task for allegedly racially profiling shoppers. we begin though tonight with break news in the new york train wreck that took the lives of four people and sent dozens more to the hospital. now, the engineer william rockefeller, may have been dozing off before his train flew off the tracks going 82 miles per hour on a curve made for 30. with us tonight nick robertson who just talked to mr. rockefeller's attorney chief international correspondent christiane amanpour and cnn legal analyst jeffrey toobin and -- >> you talked to the attorney. what did he have to say? >> he said the engineer had a good night's sleep, he went to bed at 8:30 in the evening, got up at 3:30 in the morning. turned up at work at 5:00 and had no issues getting on the train, driving the train. but he says that moment before -- at some point before he got to the curve he moment airily lost his concentration. he said he was in a daze. the lawyer even doesn't really quite
the skyline of florence, he also systematized the science of perspective which was to dominate western pictorial space until the 20th century. in masaccio's fresco of the trinity-- probably constructed with brunelleschi's advice on architecture-- classical columns and a monumental barrel vault frame the figures of christ and god, the father. here is the interaction of painting, architecture, and the mathematical analysis of space that was unique to the florentine renaissance. 1n 1419, brunelleschi had begun the hospital of the innocente. it was the first orphanage in europe to be funded by public donations, and the architecture is a delicate blending of the roman and the romanesque. it was brunelleschi's architecture which the painter fra angelico depicted in his fresco of the annunciation, which awaits you at the top of the stairs of the monastery of san marco. fra angelico lived and worked here, decorating the monastery with scenes from the new testament-- scenes striking for their simplicity and serenity. inside the cells, the world seems to retreat, leaving a single image suspended
really interesting. >> case law in there. unbelievable. >> they've got the science. >> i wish i could talk more about this. we will, we'll watch there case carefully. danny and joey, flat out of time. bye. have a great day. >> thank you, everyone for watching. around the world starts right now. >>> this is "around the world." i'm fredricka whitfield. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company today. now, we're going to talk a little bit about the train crash in new york. there have been developments. >> that's right. a deadly train crash taking place just days ago. and now we understand that the train engineer is talking and saying that he may have been in a days, quote unquote, just prior to that train derailing. let's go to washington and rene marsh for more on that. rene? >> freed and michael, we are learning more information about what happened in the moments before that speeding train jumped the tracks in the bronx. two senior law enforcement sources tell cnn producer that the train's engineer, william rockefeller, told investigators on the scene he was dazed in the mom
science there. some guy you talked to told you that. >> he owns a company. 400 employees. >> yeah, but we can't use vivid video as an example. >> they have more than that. >> i want to talk about obama's polling number. he was interviewed by i think her name is barbara walters. a delightful woman. about his polling numbers and his popularity and his trustworthiness. let's roll this, shall we? >> are you worried you won't be able to get things done because of this lack of support? >> well, barbara, if you remember, i've gone up and down pretty consistently throughout. the good thing about when you're down is that usually when you nowhere to go but up. >> it's hard to sit opposite you, mr. president, and say this, but a lot of the criticism, it's personal. people just don't think you're trustworthy. >> i don't think that's true, barbara. the truth of the matter is i got re-elected. in part because people did think i was trustworthy and they knew i was working on their behalf. >> strange answer. >> yes. >> strange answer. strange prep for that answer, i have to say. >> really, what would you
, is that people change together and community. when you look at the science of behavior change, people change together. we get better together. the science of changing biology, how to get healthy, it's easy. you eat the right today, exercise and take care of yourself. how to get people to change behavior? that's the secret. it's a social power of the social network. you're more likely to be over weight if your friend's friend's friend is over weight than if your parents are over weight. the social threads that connect us are far important. >> you're a physiatrist, getting into your world, how will you convince people in their heads, never mind anything else to come and do this? this is the master plan, you have to persuade them. >> there are 140 studies that say as your weight goes up, the actual physical size and function of your brain goes down. >> that scared me -- >> is that true? >> that's true. >> the brain gets smaller as you get fatter? >> yes. >> wow. >> i published two studies because fat produces something called -- >> i'm sucking in my stomach as we speak. and that's what rick sai
are lagging behind their international counterparts in math, reading, science. the new international standardized test scores indicate 15-year-olds in the u.s. were below the international average in math, about average in science and reading and dropped down in the ranking since the last test three years ago. the top scores from each subject came from shanghai. >>> take a look at this incredible rescue that took place 20 miles off the nigerian coast around under water. three days after a tugboat capsized, divers were looking for bodies and a hand reached up to get them. the boat's cook was alive. he survived in a four-foot air bubble. he only had coca-cola to drink. he spent so long under water with so little oxygen he had to spend another 60 hours in a decompression chamber once he returned to the surface. unbelievable. >>> fascinating photo has the internet buzzing about whether a face can be seen in a steel column from the world trade center. do you see it? workers say they have been talking about a face for a while. some even call it the angel of 9/11 but it's getting a lot of a
and fallen further in the rankings down to 31st in math, 24th in science, 21st in reading of all things. and political prospect editor kelly mcnerney joins us and who is to blame for this? >> honestly, i think it's federal government spending we're using as a remedy, just throwing money at the problem. when you look at the numbers, it's startling. we spend $15,000 per every student in this country on education and that's more than every single country in the developed world and japan beat us in the international ranking that you mentioned and we're throwing money at the problem. it's not the lack of spending, it's the character of the spending. it's not trickling down to the classroom, it's federal government regulation and it should be a state-run education should belong to the state and no child left behind. it usurps a lot of power from the states and that to me that's the problem not relegating to the states. stuart: you'd get rid of it-- not all of it, but some of the bureaucracy because that's where the money is flowing, the administrators of the schools and all kind of people bac
if upstate new york. the group says based on law of science and history, he deserved to go before a judge and be released as any human prisoner would if there is lack of cause or evidence for the detention. tommy is unorder by -- owned bya couple and they have not minuted. >> the winner of a $1.3 million lottery prize better come forward because in 12 days the money goes away, a winning ticket purchased to miami has not been claimed and, expires on december 15. you may recall a $60 million powerball ticket put in miami area expired a week ago with no one claiming that ticket, either. >> how could that be? >> the mystery would drive me more crazy. >> you have not been in miami lately? >> not me. >> will you hit the jackpot? >> if you like the cold weather the. >> or snow, because lake tahoe will have snow. here is the bay area at home, we are tracking high clouds that are keeping us relatively warm. we are going to be much cooler when the clouds leave as we look at our radar satellite the high clouds are moving out and as we look at the emeryville camera it is bouncing up-and-down because
a map. as it turns out the production was part of a commercial shoot supporting the museum of science fiction. a non-profit initiative that plans to build a full scale museum in washington. while the district has over 50 museums and historic sites, they say this would be the first in the world devoted exclusively to the sci-fi genre. supporters are hoping to raise enough money to hold up a temporary preview museum by next year. >>> up next, remember when the republican party promised to stop alienating groups that didn't vote for them? apparently the republicans don't. that's ahead. and this is "hardball," the place for politics. ♪ >>> welcome back to "hardball." after the republican party's second national defeat at the hands of barack obama last november, some of the grownups in the party decided to set out to find what went wrong. the autopsy concluded that in order to win national elections again, the republican party needed to overcome the public perception that it is intolerant, out of touch, and simply doesn't care. but have the republicans followed their own advice so far? "
in science and reading and below average in math. there were little or no gains in the last decade while other countries raced ahead of the united states. here to talk about it amanda riply author of the smartest kids in the world and how they got that way. this latest study is one of a continuing string of stud sdis that shows the u.s. educational system lacking behind the rest of the world. it doesn't seem like the u.s. is getting worse, just the rest of the world getting better. >> that's exactly right, anderson. this is very revealing. it shows we're walking around in one of those people movers going nowhere, the rest of the world, very many countries are on escalators. what this shows is it's not so much we've been doing anything differently but in a context everybody is playing to win, we are falling behind and we look at the difference between us and countries like south korea and singapore and it's widening and the gap between us and countries like poland is widening. >> amanda, you look at vietnam and has child poverty, they have done really well. what are we doing wrong, and wh
years, american 15-year-olds have fallen further behind in math, science and reading. it's dubious for a country that spends more on education than anything else. it's a key test given to 15-year-olds in 65 countries. the u.s. ranks 36th in math. east asian countries top all three categories in science, the u.s. ranks 28th. only in reading are u.s. students really above average and still pretty much in the middle of the pack. shanghai takes every spot but they hardly represent all of china. it's a slim, slim look about the education system in china. the u.s. slipped in the rankings since 2009. scores are a little changed from the first report in 2000. what's wrong here? the report blames weak u.s. curriculum and education secretary arne duncan calls it a picture of educational stagnation. this is a reality at odds with aspirations to have the best educated work force in the world. he's pushing new common core standards in 45 states. a nationwide drive to standardize education hoping to stem the slide and reenergize american students. brooke? >> we roll on. i'm brooke baldwin here i
proceeding. the most a man of science comedy johnny one of his descendants the t3 offer came as the heads of the major city providence. this is interesting to see if reason is simply about learning to balance reason i was fifteen and that is because of a fall it's an energy that i didn't feel anywhere else meditations on it but that's it sent the bike and was the no on can combine the museum fountain and art said sharif as well as cultural and spiritual capital. his boss that the government of the most useful. in fact they are close. it just a kitten intellectuals can post a few years many of them cover we'd university. no one had a fever and this was the world's first university in the lead and that has always attracted thinkers from far and wide including westerners. and while this is just upset me. so fast that the second study to be a book and the moon the moon. london irish medical professor noted in may means towards him though. historically fares is pride itself on its openness and tolerance safely say they voted that it opened at site to talk about gnosticism. and so did those th
, he was obsessed with science, astrong me, physics, he fell in with the wrong crowd, became a father too soon and lost his job and home. >> this guy patrick walks up. >> reporter: yeah. >> and says can i talk to you? >> yeah. >> reporter: what goes through your head? >> wow. >> reporter: what did you think he wanted? >> i didn't believe anything. you got the wrong guy. no, he just said hey, i have something strange but i'm pushing an offer and instantly i just said, in my mind, door number two. >> reporter: and then, the stranger actually showed up with an actual laptop, and those lessons turned into an obsession. he would write code for hours, for days on the banks of the hudson or in a nook in pratt trick's office. at night, patrick would go home and leo would go outside. shelters aren't his thing, which seem fine until winter blew in. how do you stay warm on the really bitter nights? >> you go to the train station. >> reporter: yeah. like tons of blankets. >> it's getting really cold and i keep telling him this. he's like i'm good, man, let's keep going. >> reporter: patrick wante
of urgency to get a deal or to meet any dead lien when it comes to a budget. the house science committee is out of this world. >> a full house committee will spend time today holding a hearing on aliens. >> do you think it's even conceivable that there is not other life somewhere in the universe? >> today's hearing appears to be a serious effort to educate congress. >> do you believe there's life out there, dr. dick? >> yes, i do. >> okay. dr. seger? >> yes. >> and today's top trender. bill backtracks. >> words matter. >> even if it takes a change in the law, the president should honor the commitment the federal government made to those people and let them keep what they got. >> president clinton, i think, went off the rails and defended the junk insurance industry. >> clinton says he was only trying to help by defending junk insurance. >> i was trying to be supportive of it. i said nothing about this until the president himself spoke. i don't think you can find anybody in america who has worked harder for his re-election or supported this bill or went out of his way to explain the bill
? >> no, no, it was part of the science experiment. >> oh okay. >> rapid lake and foam and stuff. make sure it didn't break. >> you weren't doing it just you know to be mean. that was last week. >> that was last week exactly. all right. we have some very cool video speaking of cool video. it snowed so much in the southwest it filled up the grand canyon. just kidding. that's fog. it doesn't happen too often. fog is a cloud on the ground. made up of water droplets and not vapor and these are really spectacularriccages from the grand -- images from the grand canyon. that's like another planet isn't it? >> it does, it looks majestic. >> very cool. okay live look outside. it is our live michael & son weather cam. very comfortable still. 55 degrees. that's a bargain for this time of night and also for this time of day. oh by the way the sunset -- already set at 4:46 but will:46 is the earliest sunset time we have by december 12th it will start setting later. okay? so -- winds calm. pressure falling a little bit. 30.03. satellite picture and radar combined still have some snow pulling out of
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. like a squirrel stashes nuts, you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® liquid gels. nothing starts working faster than zyrtec® at relieving your allergy symptoms for 24 hours. zyrtec®. love the air. [ male announcer ] this december, experience the gift of true artistry and some of the best offers of the year at the lexus december to remember sales event. this is the pursuit of perfection. ♪ >>> let's take a look at the morning papers from our parade of papers. the "l.a. times," ukraine's president is facing a 48 hour deadline to disband his government. anti-government protesters toppled a statue of lenin, the founder of the vote union. the protesters warn they will target the president's home next if he doesn't disband the government. demonstrators are rallying against the government's decision to walk away from a european union trade deal to keep close ties with russia. >> "chicago tribune," the extraordinary achievements of the 2013 kennedy center honorees were celebrated last night in washington. recipients included
behind their peers in other countries. the u.s. is now ranked 31st in math 24th in science, and 21st in reading. the assessment is based on a worldwide test taken last year by 6,000 american 15-year-olds. the test results show no improvement by u.s. students over the past decade. >>> time to show you some of this morning's headlines. "the wall street journal" says the number of banks in the united states are at their lowest level since the great depression. federally insured banks shrank to about 6900 in the third quarter, from a high of about 18,000. many smaller banks merged or simply collapsed. but overall bank deposits and assets are growing. >>> the "detroit free press" says a judge rules this morning on whether to allow the city's bankruptcy to proceed. about $18 billion in debt and liabilities must be dealt with. >> "the new york times" looks at soaring hospital charges. a day spent as an inpatient at an american hospital costs an average of more than $4,000. that is five times the cost in many other modern countries. a single stitch can cost $500. >> the
like a lot of science fiction, but amazon believes -- is this for real, ryan? >> wolf, jeff bezos is touting this as if it's very real. he says in four or five years, he hopes to be able to get your order to your door with a drone within a half hour after you place it. he's made point, click and shop a huge part of our lives. now amazon's ceo is promising delivery by drone. he unveiled his plan to cbs' "60 minutes". >> these are octocopters, but there's no reason they could be use as delivery vehicles. >> reporter: she says the vehicles they're developing can carry objects weighing up to five pounds, which he says covers 86% of the items they deliver. they can fly within 10 miles of any distribution center and they would be autonomous. that means no operator with a joystick. they'll program the coordinates of your house and it will fly there. but there are all sorts of potential pitfalls like how will they safeguard against from veers off-course and hitting us in the head? how will they avoid unknown obstacles on the roof? caitlin lee is a uav expert with ihs janes. what else can
it as technology evolved. then a gun you can print at home was considered science fiction, but now up against a deadline, the ban will lapse this monday. lawmakers in both parties punted on making any updates. >> the legislation that the house passed doesn't address the fact that somebody could sit in their house and print out a 3-d gun. >> exactly. this law was enacted 25 years ago, and technology has advanced to the point where people can make their own plastic guns. and this law does no prohibit that. >> reporter: some democrats in the senate say they'll try to close loophesand the ban on undetectable firearms but they have powerful, familiar opposition, the national rifle association which said in a statement "the nra strongly opposes any expansion of the undetectable firearms act. including applying the ufa to magazines, gun parts, or the development of new technologies." lots of lawmakers, mostly republicans, agree with the nra. >> we need to make certain that the american people are safe. at the same time, we need to respect and appreciate that the second amendment to the constitution
the science says they're right. and is it a headache or a tumor? a bad cough or cancer? how do you know when a doctor's visit is crucial? dr. samadi is here with information that could save you time, money and maybe your life. ♪ ♪ ♪ ooh, homemade soup! yeah... [ male announcer ] campbell's homestyle soup with farm grown veggies. just like yours. huh. [ male announcer ] and roasted white meat chicken. just like yours. [ male announcer ] you'll think it's homemade. i love this show. [ male announcer ] try campbell's homestyle soup. a a >>> welcome back. nearly $750 billion is wasted on unnecessary medical services in the u.s. >> when it comes to common health problems, how do you know when to visit the doctor or not and when it's a waste of money or worth your time? dr. david samati is here to tell us exactly that. good morning. >> good morning. >> so let's go through some of the symptoms. there are a lot of things people experience often. cough. you have a chronic cough. is that a big issue? >> chronic cough, the definition is actually having it over two to three weeks. 90% of these are
. >> it gives them the about to put together the story. >> reporter: but there's a big gender gap in science, technology, engineering and math. women make up almost half the work force but fill less than a quarter of jobs in those fields. goldieblocks isn't the only company giving girls serious play things. >> lego friends. >> reporter: lego has gotten in on the game. barbie is a computer engineer, and roominate, a doll house construction set that comes we electric electrical s electrical curcuits. talk about girl power. >> reporter: a future where girls can dream big. >> girls are out there making a difference in the world too. >> now you promise notice there is pink in goldieblocks. pink and purple are the most popular girl colors. it's not about that but giving them toys that use their brain. >> gift ideas for my nieces. >> it's great. thank you so much. coming up next, we heard of therapy dogs but how about therapy chickens? one family is fighting to keep their young son's beloved animal. it helps this little boy. we have the story coming up. but first, this is "today" on nbc. [ female a
you to hear from jeff bezos himself, appearing on "60 minutes." >> i know this looks like science fiction. it's not. >> wow. >> this is early. this is still years away. drops the package. >> there's the package. >> you come and get your package. we can do half-hour delivery. >> so, as we noted, today, amazon saying they will launch their drones as soon as the feds give the go-ahead. that could happen reasonably soon, perhaps 2015. brian steltzer here with me, our cnn senior media correspondent, good to see you, and also host of reliable sources, also, hln legal analyst, joey jackson. we have to listen to more of jeff bezos. >> what's the hardest challenge in making this happen? >> putting in all the redundancy, the reliability to say this can't land on somebody's head. >> okay, first to you, joey jackson, because bells are going off here as far as like privacy issues, legality concerns. >> it represents a major concern. listen, technology is a blessing and a curse, as we all know. you can use it for wonderful things, and i think people are concerned when you hear drone, you think
surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. if you're eligible for medicare, you might know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement insurance plans, they help pay some of the difference. and could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and virtually no referrals needed. so don't wait. call now to request a free decision guide to help you understand medicare. and which aarp medicare supplement plan might work best for you. there's a range to choose from, depending on your needs and your budget. and they all travel with you -- anywhere in the country. best of all, you'll be joining the millions w
and not tap water was more science fiction. this week on tuesday, the house voted to extend that law. sorry. got a little teleprompter screw up here. i'm reading the same thing over and over again. but the -- it is on to the senate now, and what is -- what makes it so complicated in the senate is the fact that senators are basically -- some senators, particularly democratic senators, who are saying that the law doesn't go far enough as it is currently written. so the question now, the dilemma now, that the senate faces is do you pass this law, do you renew this law that was created in 1988, take the attention you can get on that for another ten years, or do you wage a fight, push a fight here, saying we want this law to go farther, we want new provisions in there that would make it impossible for guns that would be printed on the new 3d printers that are coming out, that would make it impossible for those guns to pass through airport security. so that is the dilemma that they are -- that they are facing. now to give you a little history and context for this, you have to go back to the last
, science and reading have all dropped. teens in shanghai china scored the highest. >> who has the foulest mouths in the land? according to a new study, it's the people in the state of ohio. a marketing firm analyzed more than 600,000 phone calls from the last 12 months. mostly calls from consumers to businesses and the results show that people in the buckeye state wear more often. maryland and new jersey were next on the list. meantime people in washington state are the least likely to let a four letter word fly. >> nice. >> now back to willie and al. >> down in math and reading but we're up in swearing. fantastic. coming up next, the daily habits putting you at risk for the flu. >> all that after your [ laughter ] he loves me. he loves me not. he loves me. he loves me not. ♪ he loves me! that's right. [ mom ] warm and flaky in 15, everyone loves pillsbury grands! [ girl ] make dinner pop! you give them the giggles. tylenol cold® helps relieve your worst cold and flu symptoms. but for everything we do, we know you do so much more. tylenol cold®. >>> good morning to you. that breaking
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)